Jeffery Barr | Hemet Real Estate, San Jacinto Real Estate, Moreno Valley Real Estate


For those who want to purchase a luxury residence in Malibu, Los Angeles or any other California city or town, planning ahead is crucial. If a buyer has a plan in place, this individual may be able to quickly and effortlessly navigate the Golden State luxury homebuying journey.

Ultimately, there are several items for buyers to include in a California luxury property buying strategy. These are:

1. Preferred Cities and Towns

Regardless of whether you want to purchase a luxury home that overlooks the Golden Gate Bridge or a deluxe residence just minutes from Disneyland, it generally is a good idea to consider where you want to live in California. By doing so, you can narrow your Golden State luxury home search and accelerate the process of going from homebuyer to homeowner.

Typically, it helps to put together a list of your preferred cities and towns before you launch a California luxury home search. By including this list in your luxury homebuying strategy, you can hone your property search accordingly.

2. Homebuying Budget

The prices of luxury homes in California vary. For example, a luxury home in San Jose may be priced lower than a luxury house in Beverly Hills. But if you establish a property buying budget, you will know exactly how much you can spend to make your Golden State luxury homebuying dream come true.

It usually is beneficial to get pre-approved for a jumbo mortgage prior to starting a California luxury home search. If you enter the Golden State luxury real estate market with a jumbo mortgage at your disposal, you can narrow your property search to houses that fall within your price range.

3. Home Must-Haves and Wants

Think about what you must-have and want from a California luxury house – you'll be glad you did. If you incorporate Golden State luxury home must-haves and wants into your property buying strategy, you could seamlessly navigate the real estate market and discover your ideal residence in no time at all.

Differentiating California luxury home must-haves from wants often can be easy. For instance, if you must own a luxury home near a Santa Monica beach, you can tailor your property search to achieve your desired result. Or, if you want a luxury home with an amazing garden but can live without this feature if necessary, you can include a garden as a want in your property buying strategy.

Lastly, as you get ready to search for your ideal California luxury residence, you may want to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional can help you explore luxury residences in your preferred California cities or towns. Plus, a real estate agent will provide luxury homebuying recommendations and suggestions and ensure you can avoid any potential problems during the property buying journey.

Don't leave anything to chance as you prepare to pursue a California luxury house. Instead, reach out to a real estate agent today, and you can get the help you need to find and purchase a wonderful Golden State luxury residence.


The bathroom is a room of sanctuary in the home. It is the one room where, for the most part, you can find cherished, quiet time all to yourself. Even if it means locking the door to keep the kids out for the best two minutes of your day.

Which is probably why creating a spa-like bathroom is a top trend at the moment. The best part about this trend is that it doesn’t have to be obviously trendy. It’s about subtle, minimalistic details that are both functional and visually appealing.   

For those looking to invest in renovating their bathroom with a nod to both current and future styles to come here are six spa-like features that are fully functional and will transcend time.  

A European-style walk-in shower is the epitome of a spa-like bathroom right now. Open any magazine or click through any Pinterest board and you would think this is the only style of shower available.

Not only does a walk-in style open up the room adding dynamic space but it is also incredibly functional. Especially if you plan to age in place. The walk-in showers lack a ledge or lip is ideal for those with limited mobility. So whether it be from age or a wild new move at your dance class you won’t have to worry about tripping.

A popular addition to the walk-in shower is a shower bench. Typically, tiled to match the rest of the shower area it offers a space to relax and the option to slow down and enjoy your You time. Wooden shower benches are another popular option cropping up in the pages of editorial spreads everywhere. A shower bench is also another great feature to have for future planning and certainly more stylish than those plastic chairs.

Due to the style of a walk-in shower, many homeowners are skipping having the addition of a tub altogether. Many people have found that after investing in a luxurious deep soak tub they just don’t make the time to use it. However, those who do enjoy a good soak opt for a free-standing tub. This separation of shower and tub allows for the tub itself to take a spotlight and emphasize the luxurious nature of your bathroom.

Another old favorite being ushered out is the medicine cabinet. Instead, homeowners are installing a large mirror that is a work of art and statement piece. The most popular shape of the moment is the circle. You may find that your new home already comes with a builder-grade mirror that just needs some creative details to spruce it up. Add trim board in your color and finish of choice to give it a whole new lease on life.  


If you're on the lookout for your dream house, it pays to operate as a competitive homebuyer. And if you find your ideal residence, you should not hesitate to submit a competitive offer to purchase this house.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why you should submit a competitive offer to acquire your dream house, and these include:

1. You risk alienating a seller.

Dozens of homes are available in cities and towns across the United States, yet an individual's dream house may only be available for a limited time. Therefore, when it comes to submitting an offer to acquire your dream house, it usually is a good idea to put your best foot forward. Because if you submit a "lowball" homebuying proposal, you risk receiving an instant "No" from a seller.

Although you likely want to avoid breaking your budget to purchase your ideal residence, you also should strive to avoid a lowball offer. Fortunately, an informed homebuyer can learn about the local real estate market and use this information to assess the prices of houses in a particular area. And with comprehensive housing market data in hand, this homebuyer can submit an offer to purchase that may match or exceed a seller's expectations.

2. You may lose your dream house to a rival buyer.

Once you discover your dream house, you should submit a competitive offer on it right away. If you wait too long to provide a competitive homebuying proposal, you risk losing your ideal residence to a rival buyer.

Remember, the housing market is fierce, and the top residences typically will sell quickly. But if you submit a competitive offer, you can reduce the likelihood that you'll squander the opportunity to acquire your dream house.

3. You may wind up having to spend more to acquire an alternative house.

The real estate market fluctuates constantly, and failure to submit a competitive offer on a house today may prove to be a costly mistake. In fact, if a buyer's market transforms into a seller's market, you may be forced to pay more to purchase your ideal home in the foreseeable future.

For those who are uncertain about what differentiates a competitive offer to purchase from an ordinary homebuying proposal, there is no need to stress. If you hire a real estate agent, you can get the help you need to submit a competitive homebuying proposal any time you choose.

Generally, a real estate agent will serve as an expert guide throughout the homebuying journey. This housing market professional will teach you about the real estate sector and help you narrow your home search. Then, when you discover your dream house, a real estate agent will help you put together a competitive offer to purchase. He or she will even negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf to ensure you can get the best price on your dream residence.

Ready to simplify the process of buying a house? Collaborate with a real estate agent today, and you can receive extensive support at each stage of the homebuying journey.


If you’re getting ready to buy a home, you know it will be one of the most significant purchases of your entire life. However, are you fully prepared for all of the expenses that buying a home will bring? You don’t want to buy a house to find out that you can’t afford it after all.


Many expenses go into buying a home that you can plan for ahead of time. Other costs aren’t as exact that you will need to add in your budget. Read on to learn more about many of the expenses that throw first-time home buyers for a loop. 


Closing Costs


Closing costs encompass a whole bunch of expenses that you’ll incur buying a home. These include:


  • Taxes
  • Application fees
  • Attorney fees
  • Title insurance
  • Reimbursements
  • Recording fees

No matter what the closing costs include, you should plan for these expenses to be about 2-5 percent of the price of your home. Costs can vary widely, but it’s good to have a bit of extra cash on hand.


Maintaining Your Home


While most homebuyers are prepared for the initial costs of buying a home, they don't know how much it costs to maintain a home. Each year, things will come up on your property that needs to be addressed continually. These tasks include:


Cleaning

Yard care

Gutters

Pressure washing


These routine tasks are independent of other costs like replacing a stove or fixing a furnace. Homeowners need to be prepared for these expenses as well.


Taxes


Taxes can increase or decrease for any given year. You can lookup taxes in the area where you’re planning to buy a home in order to prepare yourself. You should make sure that your property taxes are comparable with that of other homes in your area.

Utilities


Utilities are what your home runs on. Depending on the climate you live in the number of utilities you pay can vary. Take into account these things:


  • Heat
  • Air conditioning
  • Water
  • Electricity
  • Phone
  • Cable
  • Internet

Most neighborhoods have one or two choices for services, so you can ask people in the neighborhood what providers they [refer and how much their bills are each month.         



Insurance


You’re required to have homeowner’s insurance when you get a mortgage. Even if you don’t take out a mortgage and pay cash for a home, it’s a wise decision to protect your investment. Estimate how much a yearly policy will cost you ahead of time. 


This insurance will protect your property from things like theft and fire. You can shop around for the best rates based on policies that suit your needs. It’s easy to price out policies online. See where you can save including discounts for security systems or multiple policy discounts. 


If you live in an area where floods or earthquakes are prevalent, you should be aware. You’ll find you need additional policies to cover damage in the event of these disasters. The most important thing about your homeowner’s insurance policy is that you check the details for all of the fine print.       



When a house is sold, it’s generally expected that the seller will take all of their personal belongings along with them. This includes furniture, pictures, cleaning supplies, and appliances that weren’t included on the deal. This is all in the expectation that the buyer will have a clean property to move into. 

If a seller does leave personal property behind, what are the rights of the buyer? Buyers may wonder if they can move in and actually take possession of the home if belongings have been left behind. There are a few reasons that buyers may leave property behind including:

  • The item is actually a fixture and not considered personal property
  • The item could belong to a tenant (or former tenant)

In these circumstances, each state determines different rights and procedures that must happen in order for the property to be secured without hassle by the buying party.


What If There’s So Much Stuff It Impedes On Moving In?


In the case that a seller has left so many things that a buyer cannot even comfortably move into the property, the contract may be refused. If there’s an inordinate amount of furniture, trash, and personal belongings, you certainly have a good argument to not sign the final contract for the property. Your rights as a buyer do, however, depend on what exactly was written into the purchase contract for the home you’re buying. 

Hidden Items

If an item has been deemed hidden or buried, the buyers have a different circumstance on their hands. Many times, a buyer is obligated to hang onto these items for the seller. The items were not technically abandoned by the seller to the buyer. The buyer becomes what is called a “bailor,” or a keeper of the property, who needs to be an agent in the change of possession of the items.  

Possession Unknown

If the ownership of an item is unknown, the terms of the contract are held up. Standard contracts generally state that any items left behind by the seller have been forfeited to the buyer. If the contract says nothing about personal property, the buyer generally takes on the role of “bailor” again in this instance.

If The Property Owner Has Died Or The Property Has Been Abandoned


If a property has been abandoned due to foreclosure or bankruptcy, or the property owner has died, any personal property that is left behind is a bit more of a risk for both parties. These circumstances generally state that a buyer will be taking on a property “as is” and essentially anything left is the buyer’s problem. 


If a property owner has died, the executors generally take on the responsibility of removing items from the property to be distributed to the rightful beneficiaries. Occasionally, this process doesn’t work out due to family quarrels. In this case, personal property of the seller goes into the category of forfeiture. 

Personal property is just one reason why you need to understand your legal rights when you’re buying a home.